the daily soup

soup diet, anyone?

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I started a new fad in my household. We now eat soup more times in a day than we have dessert. Not kidding. I love soup. Ari likes soup but only occasionally, like every time we eat out 🙂 Uri hates it. Turo is so-so about it. But hey, I’m the President of my kitchen. I do the grocery and get stuff from the market and pay for takeouts and I set the meal plan for the week. In short, I wield a lot of power over everyone else’s food choices. So one day, I woke up and said, we’re gonna eat soup everyday. And so we did.

Every morning, I wake up, cut up vegetables, simmer them in water, add a pinch of spices, a sprinkle of herbs, maybe some milk or yogurt or cream, grated cheese when I’m feeling fancy, or egg when I’m feeling exceptionally hungry. And then the rest of the pack wakes up to a bowl of soup each, with toast or crackers on the side. That’s what we have for breakfast EVERY SINGLE DAY for about a month now.

Nobody’s complaining. Who could resist my I-don’t-have-to-fix-my-own-breakfast offer? So y’all might think I’m dragging my entire household into this diet revolution, but there’s more to it than trying to lose pounds or belly flabs.

Why go on a soup diet?

#1. So we could have more vegetables in our diet. My vegetable crisper is fuller than it’s ever been in a long time. I’ve been hoarding organic vegetables on a weekly basis, from our farm, from our CSA subscription and from the organic section in the supermarket. The thing is, we’ve been farming for a long time but we’re still predominantly carnivorous. My kids eat vegetables, in trifling amounts each meal, but I know we could do better. Turo makes his organic smoothie every now and then, but not often enough that we could meet our ideal vegetable requirements on a daily basis. Because I like soup, I can camouflage all the vegetables that my children won’t eat otherwise, and I can make my children eat a bowlful each day. Win-win.

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our typical CSA veggie basket looks like this

#2. It’s fairly easy to prepare. It takes me 20 minutes tops to make a pot of soup. Boil some water, chop some vegetables, simmer the vegetables, puree the mixture, season with spices and herbs, add dairy, and toast bread while everything else is going on. And voila, we have a super easy breakfast that’s not cereals or milk and cookies. Easy but real, healthy food all in one pot.

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#3. Soup is a filling meal and gets us through an entire morning’s work. Before we went on a soup diet, we had a phase where we’d skip breakfast altogether, and have a huge brunch instead. Whoever invented brunch is a god. One filling meal, one-time cooking, one-time cleanup, on a meal good for nearly half of the day. But while brunch makes the most efficient use of our food preparation time, it’s not the most efficient use of our pre-brunch time. Of course, we haven’t eaten anything. What kind of productive morning would you expect? If we want to make our mornings count, and I mean the earlier part of the morning, we better get our asses off to the breakfast table and eat some real breakfast. This way, we’re powered up all morning through to lunch time. We’ll have managed to tick about half the things from our daily checklist, before we have another filling meal for lunch. And the best part is, we can take a midday break just because we’ve made a good enough start to our day and we’re confident that we’ll pull through the remainder of our tasks before the day ends.

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I’m no soup goddess but I do encourage you to try having more soup. It’s easy enough to adjust to your own taste, minus the agony of having to chew a cupful of vegetables from your plate. Because you’re using whole ingredients, it’s packed with nutrients and energy and fiber that your body needs. And, if you have some leftover, you can heat it up for a snack, but your kids might just hate you for it. 😉

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